Our Poodle: what it is and how it is

Among the endless descriptions of the Poodle which we can find in the most authoritative (and not) textbooks, as well as on the net, it would be appropriate to refer to that of the Official Standard which ENCI faithfully reports on its portal and which should be the main reference point of those who breed this breed.

It is a meticulous, if somewhat aseptic description, where minute particularities are considered merits or flaws of the breed.

Some characteristics, dealt with to a lesser extent, concern the character aspect instead. Great attention is paid to proportions; for example, that between muzzle and skull, between head and body, that of the length of the ears, the angle of the hind legs, and you name it.

However, those who have no interest in looking for their puppy with centimeter in hand, I quote an extraordinary description from the book Nice to meet you by Elena Garoni, where the true essence of this magnificent breed is extrapolated, in my opinion.

toy poodle from'Maatilayla cattery

You can't be vague when you have a Poodle.

How big is it? Is it large mole, medium mole, dwarf, toy?

What about the color? White, brown, black, silvery, silvery gray, gray-beige, red, beige, cream, apricot, blue, champagne, chocolate, latte, peach?

Maybe it is multicolored, as they like it in the United States, and you will be able to call it panaché, like beer with soda?

Is it a classic hedgehog or is it a cordate and they ignominiously mistake it for a Bergamasque Shepherd?

What about grooming? Lion-style, modern-style, English-style, or puppy-style?

And don't think that grooming came about for purely aesthetic purposes!

It served for water activities. The long hair on the head and trunk protected the most delicate parts exposed to cooling, while the shaved hair on the hindquarters down to the ribs allowed the dog a smoother and more swift exit from the water, without the weight of soaked fur.

A direct descendant of the Barbet, and therefore a hard worker, he left the countryside where he lays ducks and takes them out of ponds, to enter algid noble salons and courts throughout Europe, and is depicted in paintings in the arms of damsels and languidly reclining on sofas.

With the French Revolution he accompanied his noble masters on the road to exile and became known throughout Europe and then the United States.

After World War II, and the subsequent economic boom, it is among the first to enter homes as the family dog, and even now it is still unable to be completely ousted from its role, in spite of the arrival of Jack Russells and French Bouledogues.

We, who have grown up with Japanese cartoons, are unable to untie the image of the Poodle from Sweet Remi and his little white dog disguised as a circus performer, even as we are seized by a heartbreaking melancholy and a desperate sense of injustice to the world.

But from Capi, a white poodle, we have learned never to underestimate the fluffs of fur, because they are capable of learning everything, and with them you can survive the worst misfortunes

Interspecific social motivation is the tool that allowed the Poodles to be comfortable in the crowded aristocratic palaces of centuries past, on the streetcars of hurried Milan, and on the slow walks of the Ligurian waterfront.

They have a confident way with their conspecifics, backed by excellent communication, but are often hampered by show grooming, which makes them more like self-propelled puppets than dogs with firm dignity.

Their most outstanding trait is undoubtedly their collaborative motivation, which these dogs understand as being together no matter what.

Collaboration is closely related to affiliative motivation, with a feeling close to devotion.

They baste a filial relationship when they enter the home as puppies, and under conditions of balanced behavioral development they are capable of becoming mates and then parents themselves, versatile to assume diverse and appropriate roles.

The freedom to grow up, to move from puppies to adult individuals, is not taken for granted within a relationship such as the one we humans build within the narrow domestic walls.

Our overprotective connotations, which are intensified when their neotenial traits are particularly vivid, kindled by their big eyes, soft fur and unusual gaiety, are the most common cause of their failure to complete social maturity.

They risk becoming dependent on our presence; and then the affiliative motivation can take on obsessive traits, and these dogs cannot be alone even long enough to take down the dustbin, and they often become the unwitting protagonists of scenes before the building manager for disturbing the peace.

Many of them remain imprisoned in a reductive role as family children, even when they reach the age of seven, and struggle to cope with the discomfort of being away from their group.

The risk, then, is to go from devoted dogs to patients with attachment disorder.

The responsibility of the human family, then, is to escape the trap set by breed selection and our human characteristics of forsaken epimelesis (that impulse that social mammals especially feel upon being confronted with a living being, even of a different species, that somehow reproduces the infant's features and causes them not to attack it, rather to care for it) - Technical language-or cynogenetic? 

But how do you make it big?

Good self-esteem, the right hangouts, guided but autonomous experiences, a fair balance between caution and courage, winning the trust of referrals, and the valuable opportunity to make mistakes, and to be forgiven for them. All dogs can make it, at whatever age they start.

The real question is: Are we, fellow humans, sure that we really want them to be happy without us?

Maatilayla Breeding

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"Breeding conscientiously and seriously is a mission and often disregards the economic expectations that we imagine might come from this profession. My driving force is the continuous research, through careful selection work, in giving more and more value to this breed that I believe is already perfect, both in morphological and character aspects."

Layla Zarfati

Recognized

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Contact

Icons-Pawsitive+39 338 761 762 8
Icons-Pawsitive[email protected]
Icons-PawsitiveStrada Vicinale Pianamola 6, 01030 Bassano Romano (VT)

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Maatilayla Breeding

logo of'Maatilayla farm

"Breeding conscientiously and seriously is a mission and often disregards the economic expectations that we imagine might come from this profession. My driving force is the continuous research, through careful selection work, in giving more and more value to this breed that I believe is already perfect, both in morphological and character aspects."

Layla Zarfati

Recognized

enci and fci logo vertically
enci and fci horizontal logo

Contact

Icons-Pawsitive+39 338 761 762 8
Icons-Pawsitive[email protected]
Icons-PawsitiveStrada Vicinale Pianamola 6, 01030 Bassano Romano (VT)

Where we are

google map

© 2018 - 2024 Maatilayla | All Rights Reserved
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Designed and Developed by SHARKCODE

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