He who breeds, breeds everything

November 23, 2021by Layla Zarfati

This chameleon of the species Chameleo Calyptratus, was my husband's wonderful, yet unexpected, gift on the occasion of our 17th wedding anniversary.
Typically, on these occasions, one expects a ring, or, whatever, a bouquet of roses, perfume, a designer handbag. In short, girly things.
He didn't. He, who knows me better than anyone, remembered perfectly that ancient desire of mine cultivated since childhood and never fulfilled.
And that day led me to choose my gift, from among about fifteen tiny chameleons all the same, bright pea-green in color, born a few days ago in a well-stocked store in Rome.
Returning home, happy as a clam with my little box punctured by the precious contents, however, the problem of where to house Camilla arose.
In a few days, in the grip of an uncontrollable attack of art-attack, I transformed a simple shelf from Ikea, into a terrarium, ultra-accessorized and equipped with every comfort.

And, again in the space of a handful of days, our house turned into permanent housing for all sorts of insects edible to the chameleons, which, perhaps not everyone knows, feed alas only on live prey.
Flour camels, honey camels (succulent, chubby pink-confect caterpillars, to be fed sparingly because they are very substantial), crickets of all species, grasshoppers of various sizes.
But not cockroaches, those I always refused to keep, since we were lucky enough in the house not to have them of our own, it seemed unintelligent to introduce them.
Also too gross.
Needless to say, sourcing all these insects had become a chore each time, so I took to ordering them online, and once it happened that the courier, finding no one at home, thought better of throwing over the garden gate the package with contents (perhaps) unknown to him, resulting in a scattering of crickets (of non-native species, of course) all around.
I dare not imagine how much the neighbors laughed as they saw me wandering hunched over for hours, intent on such a ridiculous, yet fruitless, cricket hunt...anything to feed my chameleon!
Even today, more than a decade later, if anyone should ever think of taking a walk through the grounds adjacent to our old home, they will be able to admire curious species of tropical crickets that have perfectly acclimated and reproduced over the years.
After this incident, as a result of which I still risk a lawsuit for environmental disaster (but know that the courier was to blame and not mine) I decided that maybe it would be better to breed them, these insects, so I could also save a few little things.
Probably it was there, that the breeding ball started, who knows?
The complex study to put in place the home production of camolas, crickets and whatnot was indeed fascinating, although little was, unfortunately, their ultimate fate.
The experience of rearing insects and living with my beautiful Camilla lasted only two years, but intensely stimulating and full of incredible discoveries.
They were romantic nights, ours, delighted by the song of hundreds of crickets in love and the hours punctuated by the sonorous mist, which regulated the right humidity in the terrarium.
Stricken with a nasty intestinal parasitosis from which, despite veterinary treatment, she never recovered, Camilla left me on a bright sunny day, where I tried to revive her by resting her on top of a plant in the garden and hoping in vain for a miraculous sunbath.
Even today, when I look at her photographs, I feel a bit of nostalgic sadness; it was really a very challenging experience that I don't think I will repeat, but I am grateful for all that she and her world, unknown to me before then, gave me opportunities to discover, learn and even appreciate.
Thank you again, my little Calyptratus.

Maatilayla Breeding

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"Breeding conscientiously and seriously is a mission and often disregards the economic expectations that we imagine might come from this profession. My driving force is the continuous research, through careful selection work, in giving more and more value to this breed that I believe is already perfect, both in morphological and character aspects."

Layla Zarfati

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Icons-Pawsitive+39 338 761 762 8
Icons-Pawsitive[email protected]
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Maatilayla Breeding

logo of'Maatilayla farm

"Breeding conscientiously and seriously is a mission and often disregards the economic expectations that we imagine might come from this profession. My driving force is the continuous research, through careful selection work, in giving more and more value to this breed that I believe is already perfect, both in morphological and character aspects."

Layla Zarfati

Recognized

enci and fci logo vertically
enci and fci horizontal logo

Contact

Icons-Pawsitive+39 338 761 762 8
Icons-Pawsitive[email protected]
Icons-PawsitiveStrada Vicinale Pianamola 6, 01030 Bassano Romano (VT)

Where we are

google map

© 2018 - 2024 Maatilayla | All Rights Reserved
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Designed and Developed by SHARKCODE

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